CLA President Responds to Public Slam by Post Journal

CLA President Responds to Public Slam by Post Journal

News & Events
In a brief Letter to the Editor, CLA President Paul O. Stage responds to the public slam delivered to our organization in the The Post-Journal on March 10.   The Post Journal "Opinion" piece from March 10: http://www.post-journal.com/opinion/in-our-opinion/2019/03/who-exactly-isnt-playing-nicely-over-chautauqua-lake-policy/   CLA Letter to the Editor Response: http://www.post-journal.com/opinion/in-our-opinion/2019/03/who-exactly-isnt-playing-nicely-over-chautauqua-lake-policy/   Thank you for the editorial comment on Sunday, March 10, we appreciate the coverage The Post-Journal has given to Chautauqua Lake and the problems it currently faces. Every issue you spoke about has been discussed in our CLA board meetings as we try to find the answers to improve the lake, you could have had a seat at our table and fit right in. The 10 items submitted to the DEC are real, real issues, real problems, that need to be addressed in our current…
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Chautauqua Lake Association Urges NYC DEC to Deny Herbicide Permits on Chautauqua Lake

Chautauqua Lake Association Urges NYC DEC to Deny Herbicide Permits on Chautauqua Lake

News & Events
The Chautauqua Lake Association filed strong scientific and regulatory objections to municipal applications to the state Department of Environmental Conservation for permits to apply two powerful herbicides to 1,200 acres of Chautauqua Lake this summer.   The 10 objections range from failure to notify all effected shoreline property owners, to the lack of scientific understanding of lake currents that could spread the chemical herbicides well beyond even the large sections of the lake for which they are proposed. The chemicals are Aquathol K, containing endothall, and Navigate, containing 2,4-D. In addition, since the applications seek use of two herbicides, the effective coverage area is actually double, 2,400 acres, under the current permitting request.   “The CLA sent this letter to the DEC because it views the lake as a whole,…
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February 28 Public Comment Deadline Established

February 28 Public Comment Deadline Established

News & Events
The Towns of Busti, Ellery, Ellicott & North Harmony along with the Villages of Bemus Point, Celoron & Lakewood in conjunction with the Chautauqua Lake Partnership (CLP) have applied to the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) to treat 1200+ acres of Chautauqua Lake with both Aquathol K (endothall) and Navigate (2,4-D). Although Letters of Notification were mailed by the CLP to numerous lakeside property owners throughout the affected areas, reports have been received that the mailing coverage was not complete. Also, reports have been received that other properties which possess lake rights did not receive notice. Similarly, property owners residing outside of the affected areas did not receive the notification despite the fact that they might otherwise recreate in the affected waters. This, therefore, is to advise our members…
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Chautauqua Lake Consensus Statement 2019

Chautauqua Lake Consensus Statement 2019

News & Events
Local organizations remain committed to improving the health of Chautauqua Lake together. The management of Chautauqua Lake — and the reduction of nuisance aquatic plants and harmful algae blooms — has topped headlines and sparked many discussions in the past year. We feel it is important to state that many local organizations are working together, as we have been for decades, for a healthier lake and a healthier watershed. While some of the focuses and methods of our individual organizations may vary, we believe in the same core principles and work collaboratively toward common goals. We believe a healthy lake ecosystem benefits people and nature. A healthy lake features a healthy ecosystem with thriving aquatic plants and wildlife. Aquatic plants are essential to a healthy lake. They provide habitat for…
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Criticism and Responses Regarding Lake Management

Criticism and Responses Regarding Lake Management

News & Events
Overall, the lake is getting worse. The lake is actually improving. People's expectations are getting unrealistic, which gives a false image about the lake and what it should be. It's not, and should not be, a pristine 'swimming pool' or a weed-free lake. Removing all the weeds from the lake is the best course. Aquatic plants are critical for the lake's health, the abundant fishery and to help limit algal blooms. Plants also filter water, making it cleaner for drinking water supplies and for in-water recreational use. Get rid of all invasive weeds. The invasive plants (Eurasian water milfoil and curly leaf pondweed) have been in the lake for decades and are now an important part of the lake's ecology. They need to be controlled instead of being removed. Any…
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